IN-18048 Mangrove Science Intern

Job Locations US-DC-Washington
Posted Date 2 weeks ago(2/8/2018 4:50 PM)
# of Openings
2
Category
Oceans

Overview

World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the world’s leading conservation organization, seeks a full-time Mangrove Science intern with a background in coastal marine science to work with an interdisciplinary team to provide support an emerging mangrove conservation initiative.

Responsibilities

Internship Description: The intern will: (i) analyze status and trends of mangrove cover for WWF target countries using published datasets, (ii) identify and gather key socio-economic and biophysical contextual variables affecting mangrove restoration success, (iii) relate these contextual variables with mangrove trends to identify priority regions within countries for mangrove restoration, (iv) perform other duties as needed to support the WWF Coastal Resilience Team.

Qualifications

Minimum Requirements:Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) in ecological, interdisciplinary, or marine science, with current enrollment in a graduate program preferred; experience in conservation or related field preferred; strong data management and statistical skills.  Knowledge of GIS is required. Must be organized and self-motivated.

 

Location:

Washington, DC

 

Compensation:

Unpaid. For all unpaid internships, applicants must be enrolled in school and be able to obtain academic course credit from their university.

 

How to apply: Please submit a resume & cover letter through our Careers page.

https://careers-wwfus.icims.com/jobs/search , IN-18048

 

Applications are due March 9, 2018

 

* Please note that WWF does not provide VISA sponsorship to interns

 

As an EOE/AA employer, WWF will not discriminate in its employment practices due to an applicant’s race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, or protected Veteran status.

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